Affordable Care Act (Obamacare)

Beginning January 1, 2014, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will mandate that states provide extended Medicaid to youth who aged out of the foster care system.  This differs from the extended Medicaid program in North Carolina for aged out foster youth as its for youth that were enrolled in Medicaid upon aging out and extends to age 26 rather than 21. 

You may view an archived webcast on Implementing the Affordable Care Act for Adolescents and Young Adults: Practical Considerations athttp://learning.mchb.hrsa.gov/archivedWebcastDetail.asp?id=344.

The North Carolina Division of Medical Assistance plans to issue policy towards the end of this year in preparation of this new provision.  In the meantime, we are encouraging counties to begin thinking about how to do outreach to their aged out youth, even those beyond their 21st birthday, to ensure that they are aware of this entitlement.  The Division will work with its partners as well to begin strategizing ways to outreach to these young people.

Learn how the health care law affect  you at Healthcare.gov. This is the official site of the Health Insurance Marketplace. See all your options and get the information.

...but if you still have questions regarding where you stand with Obamacare you can contact Marcella Middleton at Marcella.middleton@ilrinc.com for help.

Beginning January 1, 2014, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will mandate that states provide extended Medicaid to youth who aged out of the foster care system.  This differs from the extended Medicaid program in North Carolina for aged out foster youth as its for youth that were enrolled in Medicaid upon aging out and extends to age 26 rather than 21. 

You may view an archived webcast on Implementing the Affordable Care Act for Adolescents and Young Adults: Practical Considerations athttp://learning.mchb.hrsa.gov/archivedWebcastDetail.asp?id=344.

The North Carolina Division of Medical Assistance plans to issue policy towards the end of this year in preparation of this new provision.  In the meantime, we are encouraging counties to begin thinking about how to do outreach to their aged out youth, even those beyond their 21st birthday, to ensure that they are aware of this entitlement.  The Division will work with its partners as well to begin strategizing ways to outreach to these young people.

Learn how the health care law affect  you at Healthcare.gov. This is the official site of the Health Insurance Marketplace. See all your options and get the information.

...but if you still have questions regarding where you stand with Obamacare you can contact Marcella Middleton at Marcella.middleton@ilrinc.com for help.

Health Care Power of Attorney

What is a Health Care Power of Attorney?

A health care power of attorney is a document that allows you to choose a person who will have the authority to make health care decisions for you if you are unconscious, mentally incompetent, or otherwise unable to make decisions.

A health care power of attorney will stay in effect forever, unless you name a new person, or you specify a date for it to end.

 

Why Do I need a Health Care Power of Attorney?

There may be times that you are unable to participate in making decisions about your health and will need someone to do that. Consider this: You are in an accident and become unconscious. Someone will need to consult with the physicians and consent to your medical treatment AND it can't be you. 

If you do not have, or want a relative to make those decisions, you will benefit from having a health care power of attorney or health proxy. This allows you to choose who will make those decisions. They could be decisions around surgery or procedures, medicines, or next steps to take. The main point is you have the option to name YOUR health care power of attorney and not leave these decisions to chance.

 

How Do I name someone to be my Health Care Power of Attorney?

Before leaving care, speak with your social worker about "executing a health care power of attorney" document. This document is legal and recognized by the state. Name this person in the document.

Be sure to select someone you trust. It could be a friend or relative or a lawyer. Anybody could be given this authority. The main thing is that the person you choose not abuse this power and will look out for your best interests.

Located at: 

Children's Home Society

Statewide

 

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